Pendle Hill Hiring Education Coordinator

Position is Key for Deepening Faith and Justice Work Among Quakers

Pendle Hill, a Quaker study, retreat, and conference center that seeks to create peace with justice in the world by transforming lives through learning opportunities, retreat, and community is seeking its next Education Coordinator. This role is responsible for a range of educational programs that reflect Pendle Hill’s mission and vision, serving the needs of Friends and other constituents.  Pendle Hill’s educational programs include on-campus workshops of varying lengths as well as online learning programs. As the main position tending to educational programs at Pendle Hill, the person in this role has the exciting opportunity to shape programs and their delivery, contributing substantively to the deepening of faith and justice work in the Religious Society of Friends. Highly organized individuals with experience in adult education, appreciation of a wide range of thought and approaches to advance social justice and deepen Quaker faith and practice, and strong alignment with the processes and testimonies of the Religious Society of Friends are encouraged to apply. See the full job posting for more information.

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First Quaker Leadings in Higher Education Event of the New Academic Year: Truth Tellers

Welcome to the first event of the Fall 2022 QLHE series.

Friends Association for Higher Education’s Quaker Leadings in Higher Education series presents, in partnership with Twin Seas Media:

Truth Tellers: Higher Education, the Arts, and Social Justice

The importance of Truth, Creativity, and the Human Story in our classrooms, our institutions, and society.

Tuesday, September 27, 2022
7:30-9 pm, eastern

To register: tinyurl.com/FAHE-09-27-22

Presenter:
Robert Shetterly
American Artist
americanswhotellthetruth.org

Moderator:
Matt Zisk
Attorney and Retired Professor
Founder and Executive Director
Cherry Brook Arts

Register by Friday, September 23 and you get to stream the one-hour documentary “Truth Tellers,” which features the presenter’s  portrait series of Americans Who Tell the Truth. (Screening only available from 5pm Friday through 8pm Saturday, September 24.)
BYO Popcorn.
Hope to see many of you there.

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Call for Book Chapter Proposal

Penn State Press: The New History of Quakerism

Call for chapter proposals for Volume 5: Global Quakerism in a Postcolonial Context: 1938 – 2018

The New History of Quakerism series from Penn State Press is the first historical series in Quaker studies in over a century, these volumes offer a fresh, comprehensive, up-to-date treatment of the history of Quakerism from its seventeenth-century origins to the twenty-first century. Using critical methodologies, this limited series emphasizes key events and movements, examines all branches of Quakerism, and explores its global reach.

https://www.psupress.org/books/series/book_SeriesTNHQ.html

Stephen Angell, David Watt and Ben Pink Dandelion are editing volume 5 of the series, covering the years 1938 -2018, and we are looking for chapter proposals. We are not wishing to be encyclopaedic in our approach to the events of this period but wish to use the best scholarship to foreground some of the key issues and tropes. The volume will be about 90,000 words long.

This is period of history in which the threads of imperialist political order began to unravel even whilst economic power remained in the global north.  This pattern is replicated in Quakerism with British and American Quakerism becoming numerically smaller than the number of Friends elsewhere. It is a period characterised by a transition within unprogrammed Quakerism and the growth and diversification of mission work and indigenous forms of the Quaker faith. We want the volume to reflect, as far as scholarship allows, the diversity of types of Quakerism and Quaker experience. We particularly welcome pieces on previously untold stories and under-researched areas of the Quaker world. Proposals that focus on empire, ethnicity, gender, Quakers in Africa, Quakers in Latin America, race, sexuality, or religious practices are especially welcome, as are proposals that make a conscious effort to critique (rather than re-inscribe) colonialist assumptions.

Chapters can be up to 7000 words long including footnotes, but shorter pieces, perhaps detailing generational experiential accounts will also be considered. We wish to be open to a variety of genres and approaches.  If chapters involve specific case studies, we hope the wider implications of the analysis can be highlighted.

If you have an idea for a chapter but would value working alongside someone else, please let us know as we should be able to pair you up with another scholar. Equally, proposals can come from joint authors.

If accepted, first drafts of the chapter would be required by August 30, 2023, with any redrafting completed by December 2023 and January 2024, for publication in 2025.

Please send a 200-word chapter proposal to us with an approximate idea of its length before October 17, 2022. We expect to make a decision on the table of contents of the volume by mid-November and would then submit the book outline to Penn State Press.

Any enquiries and for proposals, please e-mail:  ben.dandelion[at]woodbrooke.org.uk

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ESR Virtual Tour

Interested in potentially attending the Earlham School of Religion (ESR)? Attend this virtual information session on Tuesday, August 30! Here is where to register:

https://esr.earlham.edu/event/virtual-info-session/

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FAHE 2022 Conference Epistle

June 15, 2022

At the close of our 42nd Annual Conference, held online with the generous support of Earlham College and Earlham School of Religion, Friends Association for Higher Education sends our greetings and warm best wishes to Friends throughout the world.

Focused on our theme, “Quakers and Racial Justice,” we were inspired by our plenary speaker, Dr. Amanda Kemp, as well as  many workshops and presentations.  These ranged from close analysis of “Hamilton the Musical and the 1619 Project,”  to “Reflections on Incorporating Diverse and Anti-Colonial Material in Natural Science Classrooms,” to exploring ways of “Dismantling Raci(al/st) Ideology,” and to promoting “Town and Gown” community conversations about race. Our worship and other opportunities for interaction enhanced our understanding of the Friends Equality Testimony and encouraged us to support our fellow faculty, staff and student activists striving for beloved community.

In her moving, multi-media plenary, Amanda Kemp shared with us the deep personal stresses accompanying her racial justice activism. After police killed Michael Brown in 2014, the cumulative impact of ever-increasing numbers of sacrificed Black lives, along with the wearing responsibilities of participating in visible protests and the daily interpreting of events for Whites often thoughtlessly invading her personal space, opened Amanda to the pressing need for self-compassion.  Since 2020, she has found relief from relentless discourse “where there is no liberation” by accepting the unconditional love around her, in particular through her communion with trees. By listening to the trees, surrounding us everywhere, we can “feed the core” of our being, experience corresponding joy, and nourish the outward expression of our well-being; a practice well-understood and practiced by indigenous peoples throughout the world.

Friends’ paper presentations and workshops provided scholarly explorations and personal reflections on racial issues and dynamics ranging from Quaker slaveholding, to daunting modern urban segregation, to the need to challenge inequalities on our Quaker campuses.  While expanding the awareness and knowledge of the sessions’ participants , the impact on the presenters of their own work was apparent.  It’s clear that our thoughtful scholarship changes our lives, often leading to meaningful activism.

This year’s Presidents’ Panel, hosted by Earlham President Anne Houtman, featured a new twist,  including three Quaker women presidents from non-quaker Colleges, along with Malone University’s incoming president, Greg Miller. They were Sarah Bolton from the College of Wooster (soon moving to Whitman College), Sarah Manglesdorf from the University of Rochester and Marlene Tromp from Boise State University.  The challenges of leadership, guided by Quaker values, during these financially and politically challenging times, were thoughtfully explored.  

Finally, during our annual business meeting we accepted the invitation from Haverford College’s President Wendy Raymond, pandemic allowing, to gather in person in June 2023. Please join us in the continuation of this good work.

As we depart from our gathering, we stand ready to share with Friends and our colleagues in higher education a renewed sense that we must all further commit to seeking racial justice within and outside of our colleges. To this end, the vitality of our Quaker colleges and study centers remains a central concern of FAHE.

With deep appreciation for our FAHE community,

Stephen Potthoff and Donn Weinholtz, Co-Clerks

Friends Association for Higher Education

Epistle – June 15, 2022

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FAHE Conference 2022

43rd Annual Meeting of the Friends Association for Higher Education

On June 14-15, 2022, FAHE held its annual conference virtually via Zoom, hosted remotely by Earlham College and Earlham School of Religion. The conference Epistle can be found at this link.

Meanwhile, here is a recap of the conference events:

The Friends Association for Higher Education was conceived in 1979 by a group of educators seeking to bring together faculty, staff and administrators at historically Quaker colleges and universities, as well as Friends teaching at other institutions. Since its founding, FAHE has met annually at Friends institutions of higher education around the US and beyond, engaging educators and scholars in ongoing dialogue around Quaker concerns in higher education. From the very beginning, Friends have embraced a strong commitment to education, and Friends schools and colleges have attracted and welcomed both Quaker and non-Quaker educators alike who resonate with the historic Friends commitment to educating the whole person, guided by the Quaker testimonies of simplicity, peace, integrity, community, equality, and (especially in recent decades) sustainability.

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Quaker Institute for the Future Summer Research Seminar

Announcement: QIF Summer Research Seminar 2022

The Quaker Institute for the Future’s 2022 Summer Research Seminar will take place by Zoom from August 8-12. QIF Summer Research Seminars create a venue for spirit-led research using Quaker methods of discernment and reflection. In QIF, “research” goes beyond the usual academic methods and definitions to include any area of personal exploration that grows from spiritual roots, often pursued collaboratively with others in the context of action. 

The Summer Research Seminars are centered around research presentations for the whole group that include time for questions, clarification, and discussion, followed by a period of discernment conducted as a meeting for worship. Time is also reserved for theme-based discussions, worship sharing, artistic and other creative sharing, and informal interactions among participants. Both presenters and attenders are welcome.

More information about QIF Summer Research Seminars, including a registration form, is available at quakerinstitute.org. Registration is free; voluntary contributions are welcome. Proposals for presentations should be made by registering before July 15.

Stipends for young scholars — Again, this year, QIF is offering $300 stipends to applicants aged 18 to 35 years old to make a presentation on research that resonates with the QIF mission. Application details can be found at Summer Research Seminar 2022 – Quaker Institute for the Future. Stipend applications are due July 1. With questions, contact Gray Cox at gray@coa.edu or #207-460-1163.

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QLHE: Rethinking the Holy Experiment

Friends Association for Higher Education’s Quaker Leadings in Higher Education series presented:

Rethinking the Holy Experiment: Decolonizing Quakerism

What is the work of decolonization? How might it impact Quakerism, our testimonies, and our organizations?

Tuesday, May 24, 2022
7:30-9 pm, eastern

Presenters:
Cherice Bock
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary
M.S., Antioch University New England
Ph.D. candidate, Antioch University New England
Adjunct Professor
Portland Seminary
Creation Justice Advocate
Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon

Christy Randazzo
PhD, University of Birmingham
Adjunct Professor
Montclair State University, NJ
University of St. Joseph, CT

Moderator:
Ada Jaarsma
Professor of Philosophy
Mount Royal University

This panel focused on addressing the necessity of reimagining Quakerism at its foundations, with an explicitly decolonial focus. This included offering a brief explanation of what the work of decolonizing entails generally, along with an examination of the potential ways that this process could be applied to Quakerism in terms of our theology, our testimony, as well as the practical impacts of such an approach on our institutions. Cherice Bock and Christy Randazzo discussed both the challenges and opportunities they encountered as they organized a recent panel on decolonizing the Quaker Peace Testimony for the Quaker Theological Discussion Group (QTDG), with an eye to offering those in attendance some potential frameworks for continuing this work within their own meetings, churches, and institutions.

Bios:

Cherice Bock lives in Oregon, on the lands of the Kalapuya (now part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde). She is adjunct professor of ecotheology at Portland Seminary, and she leads Oregon Interfaith Power & Light at Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon. She began teaching in the theology department at University of Portland in the fall of 2020.  In the 2018–2019 school year, she served as visiting professor of environmental studies at The Oregon Extension. Bock holds an M.Div. from Princeton Theological Seminary and an M.S. in environmental studies from Antioch University New England, and she is a Ph.D. candidate in environmental studies at Antioch University New England. Bock edits the Barclay Press curriculum Illuminate, edited the environmental studies journal Whole Terrain for three volumes, and curates web content for the watershed discipleship website, a ministry of Bartimaeus Cooperative Ministries. She is the co-chair for the Quaker Theological Discussion group and is the social media editor for Quaker Religious Thought.

Christy Randazzo (PhD, University of Birmingham) teaches at both Montclair State University (New Jersey, USA) and the University of St. Joseph (Connecticut, USA), where they offer courses on religious peacemaking, introduction to religious studies, and the intersections between theology and peace work. They have also done ministry across multiple religious communities in diverse settings, including youth ministry, religious education, and social ministries amongst unhoused populations. They have written in a variety of both academic and popular settings, including the Quaker biblical studies series Illuminate, and two books for the Brill Quaker Studies series, including the upcoming A Quaker Ecotheology of Light. Christy is both an editor for the Politics of Scripture on the Political Theology Network, and the co-chair of the Quaker Theological Discussion Group.

Here is more information, including a link to the video of the presentation.

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Pendle Hill Advancement Job Openings

New Pendle Hill Job Openings: Expanding Fundraising Capacity

Pendle Hill has several job opportunities available for those interested in joining a multi-faceted, community-centered, organization. Most recently, the following openings in the Advancement department have been published:

The Advancement Associate is responsible for the administration and oversight of Pendle Hill’s donor database, Raiser’s Edge.  In addition, the Advancement Associate supports Pendle Hill’s fundraising team by providing administrative and operational support to advance Pendle Hill’s annual fund, planned giving, grants, and major gift programs.

The Grants Writer is primarily responsible for identifying and securing grant resources (from foundations and other grant-making entities). Key to success in this role is developing and writing grant proposals, relationship building with foundations, persuasively communicating Pendle Hill’s mission and vision to well-matched funders, and stewarding related plans, records, and communications.

These positions will contribute to an expanding fundraising team at this Quaker study, retreat, and conference center that seeks to create peace with justice in the world by transforming lives through learning opportunities, retreat, and community created on our beautiful 24-acre campus in unceded Lenni-Lenape territory and in virtual settings. This is a highly collaborative staff community featuring responsive leadership and partial work-from-home arrangements for office-based employees. Community-building among staff is highly prized with monthly fun activities as part of staff meeting and two longer staff retreat days a year for fun, growth, and connection among all staff. For more information about these positions and working at Pendle Hill, please visit the full job postings, linked above, or the Employment page of the Pendle Hill website.

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QLHE: Toward a Quaker Testimony of Labor

Friends Association for Higher Education’s Quaker Leadings in Higher Education series presented:

Toward a Quaker Testimony of Labor:  
What Do Our Experiences as Quakers Within Higher Education Institutions Tell Us About Our Lived, Embodied Quaker Theology?

Tuesday, April 26, 2022
7:30-9 pm, eastern

Presenters:
Windy Cooler
Doctoral Candidate
Lancaster Theological Seminary

Tom Hamm
Professor of History  
Quaker Scholar in Residence
Earlham College

Moderator:
Trayce N. Peterson
MA student/instructor
Human Rights Practice
University of Arizona

Bios:

Windy Cooler is an embraced public Friend whose ministry is held under the care of Sandy Spring Monthly Meeting, Baltimore Yearly. She earned an MDiv from Earlham School of Religion in 2021 and is Pendle Hill’s 2020 Cadbury Scholar. A current doctoral candidate at Lancaster Theological Seminary, her work incorporates ethnography and the Quaker tradition of discernment processes to help communities move forward in the Light. Windy a frequent guest of monthly and yearly meetings in the US where she has researched, lectured and given workshops on the connection between caregiving responses and justice in peer-to-peer ministry. She lives with her husband Erik and son Ob in Greenbelt, MD, and has an adult daughter, Maggie.

Tom Hamm is a lifelong Friend with roots that go back to the beginnings of Quakerism–one of his ancestors signed George Fox’s death certificate in 1691. He is a native of New Castle, Indiana. He went to Butler University on a debate scholarship, majoring in history. On graduating in 1979, he went on to Indiana University in Bloomington for his Ph.D. in history, which he completed in 1985. After teaching for two years at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, he joined the faculty at Earlham College. There he taught history and served as archivist and director of special special collections in the library. Now moving toward retirement, he is currently Professor of History and Quaker Scholar in Residence and holds the Trueblood Chair in Christian Thought. At Earlham, he has been actively involved in faculty governance and is currently the clerk of the faculty. Tom has written extensively on Quaker history. His dissertation became his first book, The Transformation of American Quakerism: Orthodox Friends, 1800-1907 (Indiana University Press, 1988), received the Brewer Prize of the American Society of Church History for best first book in American religious history. His other books include God’s Government Begun: The Society for Universal Inquiry and Reform 1842-1846 (Indiana University Press, 1995); Earlham College: A History, 1847-1997 (Indiana University Press, 1997); The Quakers in America (Columbia University Press, 2003); and Liberal Quakerism in America in the Long Nineteenth Century, 1790-1920 (Brill, 2020). He edited Quaker Writings, 1650-1920 (Penguin Classics, 2012). He has also been the author of numerous articles and book chapters, with four different chapters currently in press. He has completed a book-length manuscript on Hicksite Friends in the nineteenth century, and is currently at work on a project on Quakers and the Civil War and a collection of the writings of North Carolina Friend Mary Mendenhall Hobbs. An active Friend, Tom has served as monthly meeting clerk and as recording clerk of Indiana Yearly Meeting and the New Association of Friends. He has spoken at numerous Quaker venues, including Friends General Conference and Friends United Meeting. He was book review editor for Quaker History from 1990 to 2020, and has served on the editorial boards of Quaker History, and Quaker Studies. From 1993 to 2011, he was a member of the Indiana Library and Historical Board, serving as president 2001-2011. He has also served on the Pendle Hill board, including three years as assistant clerk. Tom and his wife Mary Louise Reynolds live in Richmond, Indiana, near the Earlham campus and across the street from West Richmond Friends Meeting, where he is now a member.

Trayce Peterson is a native of Philadelphia, PA, and grateful for her formative education experiences at Lansdowne, Media, and Providence Friends schools. She received her B.A. and her Master’s of Divinity from Earlham College and Earlham School of Religion. She lives in Tucson, AZ, and is a grad student and instructor in the Human Rights Practice program at the University of Arizona. She is an active member and on the League of Women Voters Greater Tucson board. Trayce is the co-founder of SplitSeed Productions, which uses art-based interventions to inform, educate, and explore issues of human rights. An avid film lover, she is a member of a team working on a film that profiles the work of four longtime Chicana feminist activists at the forefront of immigration rights organizing here in Southern Arizona. Among Friends, Trayce serves on the American Friends Service Committee Nominating Committee and is a General Committee member and co-clerk of the Diversity Equity and Inclusion working group of the Friends Committee National Legislation.

Link to the poster

Here is further information about this event, including a recording.

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