Author Archives: Laura Rediehs

About Laura Rediehs

I teach philosophy and peace studies at St. Lawrence University, and play flutes.

QLHE: Quaker Academics

Friends Association for Higher Education’s Quaker Leadings in Higher Education series presents:

Quaker Academics: Walking in the Light on Campus and Beyond

Tuesday, April 27, 2021
7:00-8:30 pm, Eastern U.S. time

Cara and Sa’ed explore the intersections of their Quaker and scholarly identities.

Your voluntary contribution in support of FAHE and this lecture series is greatly appreciated.

To register: tinyurl.com/FAHE-04-27

Panelists:

Sa’ed Atshan, PhD

Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology  
Visiting Scholar in Middle Eastern Studies
University of California, Berkeley

Associate Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies
Swarthmore College

Cara Curtis, MDiv
PhD Candidate
Graduate Division of Religion
Emory University


Managing Editor
Practical Matters Journal

Moderator:
David R. Ross

Research Professor
Department of Economics
Bryn Mawr College

Cara Curtis is a doctoral candidate in the social ethics at Emory University. Her dissertation, tentatively titled “Fragmented Flourishing: Maternal Perspectives on the Good Life in an Unequal Social Landscape,” investigates maternal conceptions of “flourishing” in the context of U.S. inequality. Drawing on ethnographic research in a theological studies program for incarcerated women and in mothers’ groups at nearby affluent churches, the project argues that flourishing is “fragmented” within social inequality, but that opportunities for intervention can be found in women’s everyday lives. Cara is a lifelong Quaker who grew up in Baltimore Yearly Meeting and now lives in Atlanta.

Sa’ed Atshan is Associate Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at Swarthmore College, where he is also Coordinator of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program. He previously served as a Postdoctoral Fellow at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies. He earned a Joint PhD in Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies (2013) and MA in Social Anthropology (2010) from Harvard University, Master in Public Policy (MPP) degree (2008) from the Harvard Kennedy School, and BA (2006) from Swarthmore. He is the author of two books: Queer Palestine and the Empire of Critique (Stanford University Press, 2020) and The Moral Triangle: Germans, Israelis, Palestinians (Duke University Press, 2020). His forthcoming book, Paradoxes of Humanitarianism: The Social Life of Aid in the Palestinian Territories , is under contract with Stanford University Press.

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QLHE: Creation Care and George Fox

Friends Association for Higher Education’s Quaker Leadings in Higher Education series presented:

Creation Care and George Fox: Linking 21st century praxis to early Friends

Tuesday, March 23, 2021
7-8:30 pm eastern US and Canada

Your voluntary contribution in support of FAHE and this lecture series is greatly appreciated.

Over the coming year, FAHE will devote a number of our QLHE events to themes emerging from the contributions to Quakers, Creation Care and Sustainability (Cherice Bock and Stephen Potthoff, eds.) — Volume 6 in the Quakers and the Disciplines monograph series. Join us for this first discussion of the links between intentional action to care for the ecosphere and the cultural revolution that emerged from the writings of seventeenth century Friends.

Presenters:
Cherice Bock
Portland Seminary at George Fox University

Robert Howell,
Aotearoa
New Zealand Religious Society of Friends

Walter Hjelt Sullivan,
Director of Quaker Affairs,
Haverford College

Moderator:
Stephen Potthoff
Associate Professor of Religion & Philosophy
Wilmington College

Here is a link to more information about this event, including a recording of it.

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QLHE: Supporting LGBTQ Community Members

Friends Association for Higher Education’s Quaker Leadings in Higher Education series presented:

Supporting LGBTQ Community Members:
Finding “that of God” within trans and LGBQ students and faculty

Tuesday, February 23, 2021

Presenter:
Petra Doan. Ph.D.
Professor & PhD Program Director
Department of Urban & Regional Planning
College of Social Sciences & Public Policy
Florida State University

Moderator:
David R. Ross
Research Professor
Department of Economics
Bryn Mawr College

Petra Doan struggled for many years to come to terms with her transgender identity and learned finally to “sink down to the seed which God sows in the heart” (Isaac Penington, 1661 as quoted in Britain Yearly Meeting Faith and Practice, Chapter 26, 70). In this even, she shares some powerful insights that she received on her journey towards wholeness that enabled her to become a visible presence and respected advocate for LGBTQ students and faculty. Her talk provides suggestions gleaned from more than 20 years of being an “out” faculty member, advisor to the Pride Student Union, and board member for the Safe Zone Program at FSU. Her insights are intended to empower faculty to take steps to make their campuses safer as well as more welcoming places for trans, gender non-conforming, and other queer individuals.

BIO

Petra Doan joined the Society of Friends in 1972 while a student at Westtown School. At Haverford College she helped revive the Quaker Activities Committee (QUAC) and majored in philosophy. After serving two years in the US Peace Corps in Togo as a rural development construction volunteer, she began graduate study at Cornell University in International Development Planning. She received an M.R.P. and a Ph.D. in that area. In 1989 she joined the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at Florida State University and also moved her membership to Tallahassee Monthly Meeting where she remains a member in good standing. In 1998 she came out to her faculty colleagues as a transgender woman and since that time has also transitioned her research and service commitments. She conducts research on planning issues surrounding the LGBTQ community, especially the consequences of highly gendered urban environments for vulnerable populations, such as trans and gender non-conforming individuals. She has edited two books: Queerying Planning: Challenging Heteronormative Assumptions and Reframing Planning Practice published in 2011 by Ashgate and Planning and LGBTQ Communities: the Need for Inclusive Queer Space published by Routledge in 2015 and contributed numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals and chapters in a wide variety of volumes. She has had leadership roles in a variety of organizations, including serving as co-clerk of Friends for Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender Concerns, national board service for the American Friends Service Committee as well as Statewide board of Equality Florida. Within the academic planning community she co-founded Inclusion an interest group of LGBTQ planning faculty and was elected President of the Faculty Women’s Interest Group (FWIG) from 2017-2019

Here is a link to a video of this event and other supporting materials.

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QLHE: Care in Times of Conflict

Friends Association for Higher Education’s Quaker Leadings in Higher Education series presents:

“Care in Times of Conflict:
Cultivating Vulnerability and Resilience”

Tuesday, January 26, 2021
7-8:30pm eastern US and Canada

Working with students, peers, and the self to remain grounded and open in increasingly stratified times.

Your voluntary contribution in support of FAHE and this lecture series is greatly appreciated.

Panel:
Wess Daniels,
Ph.D.
William R Rogers Director of Friends Center and Quaker Studies
Guilford College

Carl Magruder, M.Div., BCC
Palliative Care Chaplain and
Director of Spiritual CareResolution Care

Rabbi Nora Woods
Interfaith Chaplain
Bryn Mawr College

Moderator:
Donn Weinholtz,
Ph.D.
Professor of Educational Leadership, Retired 
University of Hartford

C. Wess Daniels, Ph.D. is the William R. Rogers Director of Friends Center & Quaker Studies at Guilford College. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina with his wife, Emily and their three children and their rescue pup, Magnolia. Identifying as a “convergent Friend,” Wess is a bridge-builder and boundary-crosser and is interested in teaching liberating faith and practice and the revitalization of faith traditions that work toward justice. Prior to teaching at Guilford, Wess was a “released Quaker minister” at Camas Friends Church in Washington.

He is the author of, “Resisting Empire: The Book of Revelation” (2019) and “A Convergent Model of Renewal: Remixing The Quaker Tradition in Participatory Culture” (2015). He is active in the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival and has been a co-planner for the weekly Freedom Church of the Poor, an online worship service that lifts up the stories of the poor and dispossessed.

In his off time, he runs a small coffee roasting business called Fireweed Coffee, listens to his record play, and loves riding his motorcycle.

Carl Magruder, M.Div., BCC, is a “cradle Quaker” of the waiting worship tradition. He lives in California, where he works as a palliative care chaplain, accompanying those with life-limiting illness.  An EarthQuaker, Carl finds that of God in the world around him—“the text God wrote Herself.”  Carl is a bicyclist, beekeeper, bibliophile, motorcyclist, tinkerer, and fountain pen restorer.  He has two kids, aged 13 and 17.  In this time of transition, Carl wonders at the Jack Pine, whose cones only open and germinate in fire.  Can Friends be a people of faith on fire, germinating spiritual seeds that bring vitality to the interconnected web of being? 

You can find out more about Carl at Soulways Ministries (https://www.civiclight.org/soulways)  Carl has begun work on his podcast, “How to Beat Cancer Even if It Kills You.”

As the Interfaith Chaplain, Rabbi Nora Woods provides spiritual care for the Bryn Mawr community, supports religious life on campus, and helps to facilitate interfaith community building.

In her role as chaplain, Rabbi Nora strives to create a safe, accepting, warm environment in which students can explore their spiritual identity, place in the community, and moral convictions. She believes that spiritual health is a significant component of wellness and is achieved when one’s beliefs match one’s day to day actions. Rabbi Nora seeks to help students discern their highest ideals and figure out how best to live according to them.

Rabbi Nora was ordained as a Reconstructionist Rabbi at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in June 2020. She graduated with a B.A. in Religion from Earlham College and received a certificate in Leading Spiritual Diversity in Higher Education from New York University’s Of Many Institute. From 2016-2019 she served as the Rabbinic Intern and Jewish Advisor for Bryn Mawr’s Hillel. Prior to coming to Bryn Mawr she served as the rabbinic intern at Georgetown University. She has also been a T’ruah Fellow, working with survivors of human trafficking in New York City, and a chaplain for seniors at Abrahamson Center for Jewish Life in North Wales, Pa., and at Hebrew Senior Life in Boston, Mass. 

Aside from issues of faith and identity, Rabbi Nora loves to talk about farming, musical theatre, and food. When not at work or school, she can often be found supporting the work of community organizers, watching sports, and playing outside. She is a graduate of Earlham College.

Here you can find a link to the video of this event plus other materials.

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Call for Proposals: 2021 Virtual FAHE Conference

Call for Presentations, Workshops, and Papers:

2021 FAHE Virtual Conference: Peacemaking and the Liberal Arts

Earlham College & Earlham School of Religion, Richmond Indiana

Virtual Conference

Monday, June 7 – Friday, June 11, 2021

Click here to submit a proposal.

The planning committee for the 2021 virtual conference of the Friends Association for Higher Education invites proposals for presentations, workshops, panels, and papers that speak to the theme of Peacemaking and the Liberal Arts. We seek proposals from faculty, staff, administrators, and trustees on the theme of the conference or other topics reflecting Quaker concerns in higher education. Those who had their proposals for the June 2020 conference accepted are automatically accepted for the 2021 conference. However, those who had proposals accepted for 2020 will need to resubmit their proposals on the FAHE website.

The Quaker peace testimony calls us to work actively for the just and peaceful transformation of conflict, and for the removal of causes of violence and injustice. As educators at Quaker and non-Quaker institutions, what roles do peacemaking and social concern play in your context of higher education? Given the changing landscape of higher education when there is pressure to make education focus more intentionally on career-oriented preparation, what is the future of programs (both curricular and co-curricular) specializing in peacemaking and social justice?

Contributions are welcome from across the academic disciplines, from administrative staff and faculty, and from peacemaking practitioners. Those who work at Quaker institutions of higher education, Friends at non-Quaker schools, and those who are concerned for peacemaking among Friends are encouraged to consider offering a submission.

This year’s Program Committee offers these queries to provide focus, direction and inspiration in crafting proposals for presentations:

  • How do our Quaker perspectives in peacemaking shape our work with students, colleagues, and the institutions for whom we work?
  • In what ways can and should our institutions of higher education act as a local and global force for peace and justice?
  • What are the tensions between institutional stakeholders (e.g. students, administration, trustees, alumni, local community) regarding peacemaking and how do we approach those differences?
  • How do we engage the voices of those who do not share our individual and institutional perspectives on peace and justice?

Submissions might explore aspects of the Quaker tradition regarding peacemaking but the overall goal is looking forward: From your perspective, what is needed for Friends’ peacemaking efforts now and in the future? Proposals on Quaker pedagogy and concerns are also welcomed.

Proposals may be submitted online until March 30, 2021. The Program Committee will send a confirmation of receipt for each submission. Presenters will be notified of acceptance no later than April 30, 2021. Presenters of accepted proposals should register for the conference. Registration information will be available soon.

Proposals for chapters in the next FAHE book, New Directions for Quaker Peacemaking, are also invited. Presentations offered at the 2021 conference may be developed into a proposal for this 8th volume in the FAHE Quakers and the Disciplines series.

Questions? Please contact Lonnie Valentine at valenlo@earlham.edu

Members of the program committee:

Meg Streepey-Smith, Earlham College

Walter Sullivan, Haverford College

Lonnie Valentine, Earlham School of Religion

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Quaker Leadings in Higher Education Upcoming Events

FAHE is proud to kick off our 2021 program year!
Every fourth Tuesday at 7pm.

Upcoming presenters:

Petra Doan
Professor of Urban and Regional Planning
Florida State University

Cherice Bock
Adjunct Professor of Ecotheology 
Portland Seminary

Sa’ed Atshan
Assistant Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies 
Swarthmore College

More information upcoming.

But this month:

Friends Association for Higher Education’s Quaker Leadings in Higher Education series presents:

Care in Times of Conflict:
Cultivating Vulnerability and Resilience

Tuesday, January 26, 2021
7-8:30pm eastern US and Canada

Panel:
Wess Daniels, Ph.D.
William R Rogers Director of Friends Center and Quaker Studies
Guilford College

Carl Magruder, M.Div., BCC
Palliative Care Chaplain and
Director of Spiritual CareResolution Care

Rabbi Nora Woods
Interfaith Chaplain
Bryn Mawr College

Moderator:
Donn Weinholtz, Ph.D.
Professor of Educational Leadership, Retired  
University of Hartford

Here is more detailed information and registration information.

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QLHE: Quakers, Social Work, and Justice Concerns

The seventh event in our Quaker Leadings in Higher Education series was held on Tuesday, November 24, 2020, 7:00-8:30 pm, EST. The theme was:

“Quakers, Social Work, and Justice Concerns: Relevant Now, More than Ever!”

Conversation between contributing authors to Quakers and the Disciplines Vol 7

Your voluntary contribution in support of FAHE and this lecture series is greatly appreciated.

Panel:
Paul Anderson,

PhD, Professor of Biblical and Quaker Studies,
George Fox University

Douglas C. Bennett, Ph.D.,
President Emeritus, Earlham College

Nelson E. Bingham, Ph.D.,
Professor of Psychology Emeritus, Earlham College

Mark Bredin, PhD,
Hospital chaplain

Jen Buck, PhD, 
Assistant Professor of Practical TheologyAzusa Pacific University

Max L. Carter, PhD.
Director of Friends Center and Quaker Studies, Guilford College (retired)

Wendy Grab MSW/LISW, 
Assistant Professor of Social Work, Wilmington College

Erin Johnson, MSW. 
Director, Bachelor of Social Work Program, George Fox University

Christy Randazzo, PhD, 
Associate Professor of Awesomeness in the Skills of Adjuncting

Daniel Rhodes, PhD, LCSW,  
Director of Undergraduate Studies for Social Work. UNC-Greensboro

Linda B. Selleck, MA, 
Retired Friends Minister & Educator

Moderator:
David R. Ross
Research Professor Department of Economics,
Bryn Mawr College

Here is a link to more information, including a video of the presentation.

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QLHE: Mind, Spirit, and Advocacy

The sixth event in our Quaker Leadings in Higher Education series was held on Tuesday, October 27, 2020. The theme was:

Mind, Spirit and the Pedagogy of Political Advocacy: Thomas Kelly encounters the FCNL

Scholars and grassroots advocates examine faith and prophetic policy change.

This workshop will explore the perspectives of both scholars and grassroots advocates to examine how leading with one’s faith is a powerful approach to advocate for prophetic policy change.

Ron Rembert, retired Professor of Religion and Philosophy from Wilmington College, will speak on his article “Thomas Kelly on “The Eternal Now and Social Concern.”

He will be in dialog with two staff members from the Friends Committee on National Legislation: Larissa Gil-Sanhueza, Young Adult Advocacy Coordinator, and Sarah Freeman-Woolpert, Advocacy Teams Trainer. Larissa oversees the training and organizing of young adults from around the country who are mobilizing their communities to take action. Sarah trains and supports advocates to lobby Congress more effectively through FCNL’s Advocacy Teams program.

Presenters:

Sarah Freeman-Woolpert
Advocacy Teams Trainer
Friends Committee on National Legislation

Ron Rembert
Professor of Religion and Philosophy, retired
Wilmington College

Larissa Gil Sanhueza
Young Adult Advocacy Coordinator
Friends Committee on National Legislation

Moderator:

David R. Ross
Research Professor
Department of Economics, Bryn Mawr College

Here is a link to the video and other materials about this event.

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Call for Proposals: Essays for “Future of Quaker Peacemaking” Book

Friends may be interested to contribute to the next Friends Association for Higher Education​ book, “The Future of Quaker Peacemaking: Quakers and the Disciplines, Volume 8,” editors: Lonnie Valentine (Earlham School of Religion​) and Christy Randazzo (Montclair State University).

The Friends Association for Higher Education seeks contributions for a volume of essays exploring the future of Quaker peacemaking. Proposals can be from within any academic discipline as well as from the experience of practitioners.

Proposals of 800-1000 words to be submitted by March 15, 2021. Please click here to submit your proposal. Guidelines include:

  1. This volume is intended to consider possibilities for the future of Friends’ work for peace with justice. Though essays will draw upon the past and present, the goal is to consider where we go now, given the current state of our Society, our country, humanity, and the earth. We will be looking for a range of foci in the essays selected seeking to cover a wide sampling of ideas and actions.
  2. Therefore, essays can consider Quaker individuals, movements, and institutions, including our K-12 and college schools, and argue for what we learn from them for the future. Essays are to present the case for what we ought to be doing individually and corporately.
  3. As best as the editors can, essays will have similar simple formats. This includes a clear opening paragraph stating the claim to be supported and the way (discipline, method, etc.) taken to support the claim, a body of clearly developed argument, and a conclusion summarizing the argument.
  4. These essays can be developed from presentations made at the Earlham 2021 conference on the theme of “Peacemaking and the Liberal Arts”. Your essay can also be drawn form other conferences or papers, but are to be distinct from prior publications.
  5. Include proposed questions for discussion.
  6. Essays are to be submitted in Chicago/Turabian style and Word compatible.

The final essay will be between 4,000 and 8,000 words, including footnotes and bibliography. If you have questions, please contact editors Lonnie Valentine or Christy Randazzo.

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QLHE: Freedom from Racism

The fifth event in our Quaker Leadings in Higher Education series was held on Tuesday, September 22, 2020. The theme was:

Freeing Higher Education from Systemic Racism: Cultivating healthy environments to learn and teach 

Which kinds of STEM training programs and mentorship experiences are more likely to result in historically excluded students persisting in academic career pathways? How might retention be helped by certain institutional policies and a climate that provides kindness cues that affirm social inclusion?

Presenter:

  • Mica Estrada, Associate Professor in Social and Behavioral Science and Institutes for Health and Aging, University of California, San Francisco; Director, Civic Light Projects

Moderator:

  • Walter Hjelt Sullivan, Director of Quaker Affairs, Haverford College

Here is a link to the presentation and other related materials.

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